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Gardening Carolina

Appalachian Mountains,Piedmont and the Coastal areas.

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North Carolina Planting Chart

The time at which vegetables are planted outdoors depends on the cold hardiness of a particular species or cultivar. Vegetables can be divided into two categories based on temperature requirements: cool-season and warm-season crops.

Cool-season vegetables originated in temperate climates and have their favorable growth period during the cool parts of the year. Cool-season crops grow poorly in summer heat. Though cool-season crops continue to grow well past the earliest freeze in the fall, they should be started early enough to mature before hard freezes are expected.

Warm-season crops primarily came from subtropical and tropical regions and require warm weather for seed germination and plant growth. They are injured or killed by freezing temperatures and should not be planted outdoors in the spring without protection or until the danger of freezing temperatures is past. Warm-season crops planted in the summer to mature in the fall should be planted early enough so they can be harvested before the killing freeze in the fall.

To determine when to plant cool- and warm-season vegetables in South Carolina, refer to Table 1. Knowing the number of days required to reach maturity, a gardener could determine the appropriate planting time for seeds and transplants by using the average dates of the first and last freezes in their area.


Piedmont: Abbeville, Anderson, Cherokee, Chester, Edgefield, Fairfield, Greenville, Greenwood, Lancaster, Laurens, McCormick, Newberry, Oconee, Pickens, Saluda, Spartanburg, Union and York counties.
Central: Aiken, Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Calhoun, Chesterfield, Clarendon, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Kershaw, Lee, Lexington, Marion, Marlboro, Orangeburg, Richland and Sumter counties.
Coastal: Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Hampton, Horry, Jasper and Williamsburg counties.

Vegetables
Suggested Planting Dates1
for Seed or Transplants
Suggested Cultivars
Distance Between Plants inches
Planting Depth inches
Min. Soil Temp. °F2
Days to Maturity
Asparagus (crowns) Nov. 15-Mar. 15 Mary Washington, Jersey Giant, Jersey Gem 15 6.0 2 years
Beans, snap Apr. 15-July 15 Tenderette, Harvester, Roma II (flat), Derby, Dandy 3 1.0 60 50-55
Beans, pole Apr. 15-July 1 Kentucky Wonder 191, Blue Lake Stringless, Romano, Kentucky Blue 6 1.0 50 65-70
Beans, bush lima May 1-July 1 Fordhook 242, Bridgeton, Early Thorogreen 6 1.5 65 65-80
Beans, pole lima May 1-June 15 King of the Garden, Carolina Sieva (small) 6 1.5 65 75-95
Beets Mar. 15-Apr. 15; July 15-Aug. 15 Ruby Queen, Early Wonder, Red Ace, Pacemaker II 2 0.5 50 55-60
Broccoli3, 4 Mar. 15-31; July 15-Aug. 15 DeCicco, Packman, Premium Crop, Green Duke, Emperor 18 0.5 45 70-80
Brussels sprouts3, 4 July 1-15 Long Island Improved, Jade Cross Hybrid 20 0.5 45 90-100
Cabbage (plants)3, 4 Feb. 1-Apr.1; Aug 1-15 Round Dutch, Early Jersey Wakefield, Red Express, Red Rookie, Sweetbase 12 0.5 45 70-80
Cabbage, Chinese Mar. 15-Apr. 1; Aug. 1-15 Pak Choi, Mei Ching, Jade Pagoda, China Pride 12 0.5 50 75-85
Cantaloupe Apr. 20-June 1 Classic, Magnum 45, Ambrosia, Honey Brew 24 1.0 70 85-99
Carrots Feb. 15-Mar. 1; July 1-15 Danvers Half Long, Spartan Bonus, Little Finger, Thumbelina, Scarlet Nantes 2 0.25 45 85-95
Cauliflower3, 4 Mar. 15-31; Aug 1-15 Early Snowball "A", Violet Queen, Snowcrown 18 0.5 45 55-65
Collards3, 4 July 15-Aug. 15 Vates, Morris' Improved Heading, Carolina, Blue Max 18 0.5 45 60-100
Corn, sweet Apr. 15-June 1 Silver Queen, Seneca Chief, Honey 'N Pearl, How Sweet It Is, Bodacious, Merit 12 1.5 50 85-90
Cucumbers, pickling Apr. 20-May 15; Aug. 1-15 Carolina, Calypso, Liberty (mtns.), County Fair '83 10 1.0 65 40-50
Cucumbers, slicing Apr. 20-May 15; Aug. 1-15 Poinsett 76, Sweet Slice, County Fair '83, Salad Bush, Fanfare 10 1.0 65 40-50
Eggplant (plants)3, 4 May 1-31 Florida Highbush, Special Hibush, Ichiban, Rosa Bianco 24 0.5 70 80-85
Kale Mar. 1-Apr. 1; Aug. 15-Sept. 1 Green Curled Scotch, Early Siberian, Vates, Dwarf Blue Curled Scotch, Blue Knight 6 0.5 45 40-50
Kohlrabi Mar. 1-Apr. 15; Aug. 1-Sept. 1 White Vienna, Grand Duke Hybrid 4 0.5 55 50-60
Lettuce (leaf) Mar. 1-Apr. 1; Aug. 1-Sept. 1 Grand Rapids, Salad Bowl, Buttercrunch, Red Sails, Romulus 6 0.25 45 40-50
Lettuce (head) Feb. 15-Mar. 15; Aug. 15-31 Great Lakes, Ithaca 10 0.25 45 70-85
Mustard Mar. 1-Apr. 1; Aug. 1-Sept. 15 Southern Giant Curled, Tendergreen, Savannah 2 0.5 40 30-40
Onions (seeds) Jan. 15-Mar. 31; Sept. 1-30 Texas 1015, Granex 33, Candy 4 0.5 50 130-150
Onions (sets or plants) Feb. 1-Mar. 15; Sept. 1-15 Ebenezer, Excell, Early Grano 4 60-80
Okra May 1-31 Clemson Spineless, Lee, Annie Oakley, Burgundy 12 1.0 70 60-70
Peas (edible-podded) Jan. 1-Mar. 15 Sugar Snap, Mammoth Melting Sugar, Snowbird, Sugar Bon 1 1.0 40 60-70
Peas, garden Jan. 1-Mar. 15 Wando, Green Arrow, Freezonian, Tall Telephone 1 1.0 40 65-70
Peas, southern May 1-July 1 Dixilee, Mississippi Silver, Colossus, Hercules, Mississippi Purple Hull 4 1.0 70 55-65
Peppers, sweet (plants)3, 4 May 1-31 California Wonder, Yolo Wonder, Pimento, Mexi Bell, Jingle Bells, King Arthur, Lilac Bell, Lemon Bell 18 0.5 65 75-80
Peppers, hot (plants)3, 4 May 1-31 Red Chili, Cayenne, Hungarian Yellow Wax, Super Chili, Super Cayenne, Mitla, Surefire, Biscayne, Habanero, Thai Dragon 15 0.5 65 75-80
Potatoes (Irish) Feb. 15-Apr. 1 Kennebec, Red Pontiac, Yukon Gold, Superior 10 5.0 40 95-120
Pumpkins Apr. 15-June 15 Autumn Gold, Howden's Field, Spookie (small), Baby Bear, Connecticut Field, Big Moon (big), Jack Be Little (dwarf) 48 1.5 70 115-120
Radishes Feb. 1-Apr. 1; Aug. 15-Sept. 15 Early Scarlet Globe, Cherry Belle, Snowbells, White Icicle 1 0.5 45 25-30
Radish, Diakon Feb. 1-Apr. 1; Aug. 15-Sept. 15 April Cross, H. N. Cross 4 0.5 50 60-75
Rutabagas Feb. 1-Apr. 1; July 1-Aug. 1 American Purple Top, Laurentian 4 0.5 60 70-80
Spinach Feb. 15-Mar. 15; Aug. 1-15 Hybrid 7, Dark Green Bloomsdale, Tyee Hybrid 6 0.5 45 50-60
Squash, summer Apr. 15-May 15; Aug. 1-15 Seneca Prolific (yellow), Zucchini Elite (green), Sun Drop, Goldbar, Sunburst, Peter Pan 24 1.5 60 50-60
Squash, winter Apr. 15-May 15; Aug. 1-15 Sweet Mama, Early Butternut, Spaghetti, Cream of the Crop, Table Ace, Lakota, Butterbush 36 1.0 60 70-95
Sweetpotatoes4 May 15-June 15 Porto Rico 198, Jewel 10 70 95-125
Swiss chard Mar. 15-May 1 Lucullus, Rhubarb Chard 6 0.5 50 60-70
Tomatoes (plants)3, 4 Apr. 20-July 15 Whopper5, Mountain Pride, Celebrity5, Better Boy5, Husky Gold, Patio, Big Beef5, Golden Boy 18 0.5 60 75-85
Turnips Feb. 1-Apr. 15; Aug. 1-31 Purple Top White Globe, Just Right, Tokyo Cross Hybrid, White Egg, All Top 2 0.5 60 55-60
Watermelons Apr. 15-June 1 Congo, Sweet Princess, Golden Crown, Yellow Doll, Tiger Baby
60 1.5 70 90-100

1 Dates shown are for the upper coastal plain and lower piedmont. In western North Carolina delay planting 10 to 20 days in spring. In eastern North Carolina plant 7 to 14 days earlier in the spring and 7 to 10 days later in the fall.
2 At these temperatures germination and emergence should be rapid. Planting at lower soil temperatures would delay or prevent germination.
3 Seeding depths and soil temperatures are given for gardeners who wish to grow their own plants.
4 Set plants with at least 50 percent of their length below ground.
5 Carries resistance to verticillium wilt, fusarium wilt, and root-knot nematodes.

© Erv Evans, Consumer Horticulturalist
Shoprights NC State University.



 

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